Thursday, 3 October 2019

Get ready to say goodbye to pulling out laptops at airports

One of the most tiresome rituals for any business traveller is removing their laptop computer for airport security checks - and then trying to make it fit back in their bag once it has gone through the scanner.

There has not, to my knowledge, ever been a case of a laptop being found containing explosives at one of these checkpoints, but the charade continues worldwide; helping to make us "feel safe".

Now, following a trial at Melbourne Airport conducted by Smiths Detection, Terminal Four has gone live with the latest checkpoint screening technology featuring Computed Tomography (CT) X-rays.

 
This technology allows laptops and liquids to remain in bags and has been a huge success with travellers since Melbourne Airport first ran a trial in 2018.

The implementation marks Melbourne Airport as the first major airport in Australia to adopt and deploy the latest CT screening systems at its checkpoints. 

The domestic terminal currently features four new security lanes made up of carry-on baggage scanners, HI-SCAN 6040 CTiX, automated tray return system, iLane.evo and screening management platform, Checkpoint Evoplus, all designed to improve speed and security of the screening process.

Two additional units in T4 and another seven in T2, are expected to be completed over the next two months.

"Our pilot program with Smiths Detection was a huge success with passengers, giving us the confidence to enhance our security screening operations using CT technology-based systems that are compliant with the Australian government regulations," said Melbourne Airport Chief of Aviation, Andrew Gardiner. 

"We've partnered with Smiths Detection for over 10 years and we look forward to our continued partnership in shaping a better overall experience for our passengers."

The CT technology allows everything to stay in a passenger's bag, including laptops, resulting in a quicker screening process. 

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